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On the power and the downside of the imagination

Someone Else Every Day

Merel Eyckerman & Jef Aerts

Juno is someone else every day: a conductor, a deep-sea diver, a racing driver, a teacher. But she can just as easily morph into a green pea, or a party with loud music: her imagination knows no bounds. Her little brother Billy loves to play along. But then a large beast creeps into Juno’s imagination, over which she soon loses control. Shocked, she decides to be nobody at all. But luckily there is Billy, who tells her that she will always be herself – and that self is a girl with a big imagination.

Remarkable illustrations
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Jef Aerts wrote a stripped-down, minimal text, with enough space for the reader’s own interpretations. The way Juno explores the limits of her imagination is beautifully reflected in the exuberant illustrations by Merel Eyckerman. She cleverly blurs the boundaries between fantasy and reality, while the lively compositions keep things moving at a snappy pace. ‘Someone Else Every Day’ is a playful ode to the imagination, while not denying that it can have a downside too.

Understated, atmospheric and delicate
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