Skip to main content

Wordless

trans­lated into
  • Cover 'Daan Quichot'
    Cover 'Daan Quichot'
    Daan Quichot
    Pure emotion evoked by a succession of drawings. A gem
    Veto Stript

    In this terrific adventure chockful of exuberant fantasy and fun ideas, Daan and his ginger cat Panza are gathering the ingredients for that evening’s spaghetti. Stedho proves that he doesn’t need words to tell his story. Daan, Panza and granddad Pier promptly conquer a place in the hearts of readers, be they children or adults.

  • Cover 'Maelstrom'
    Cover 'Maelstrom'
    Maelstrom
    Breathtaking and stylistically stripped down
    Metro

    A fascinating wordless adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe’s well-known short story ‘A Descent Into the Maelström’. Hudréaux has gone for a free interpretation in ninety-nine etchings that swaps the sense of oppression in the original for a broader, more atmospheric depiction. An intriguing and beautiful graphic novel.

  • Cover 'Beatrice'
    Cover 'Beatrice'
    Beatrice
    A triumph of atmosphere and style
    Knack

    1972. Young Beatrice is transported back to the roaring twenties when she finds a photo album in a discarded bag and goes in search of the places in the pictures. Drenched in nostalgia and melancholy, with detailed drawings dominated by shades of red and brown, ‘Beatrice’ is a story full of enchantment and atmosphere.

  • Cover Otto
    Cover Otto
    Otto
    This sparkling, beautifully designed book is a real revelation.
    De Standaard

    This humorous and text-free story is extremely fast-paced. De Decker’s humour explores the boundaries of the (im)possible, but remains disarmingly innocent at the same time. Otto’s world is one of weird trains of thought and unexpected twists and turns. Its warm heart immediately draws the reader in.

  • Cover Murphy's Miserable Space Adventures
    Cover Murphy's Miserable Space Adventures
    Murphy’s Miserable Space Adventures
    Charming and full of promise
    Stripgids

    Murphy is an anti-hero: an astronaut who continually has bad luck. In his miserable space adventures, Charlotte Dumortier is able to experiment fully with colour, framing and page division. The young artist pulls out all the stops. She lets fly with lay-out, rhythm and colouring.